Archive

NICK

SF 1

I describe Chenoeh Miller’s Sound and Fury parties as the sort of parties that a classic Bond Villain would throw. Lurid colours, pockets of performance firing off in every corner of the space, in and around the crowd, and an abiding sense that you’ve stumbled into a scene from some larger, life-and-death sequence in the lives of the performers.SF 3

I’ve been performing in the Sound and Fury Ensemble for I guess three years now. For me it’s a mix of out-of-the-comfort-zone (being part of full-blown production-number dance items alongside a group of actual highly-trained dancers) and fantasy self-indulgence (straight up pop ballad singing in an array of garish outfits). Chen and the rest of the ensemble are among my favourite people I’ve ever worked with, and the busyness of all our lives means that the normally once-a-quarter instances of Sound and Fury tend to rush by in a blitz of last minute rehearsals and frantically-rigged sound cues.

SF 4

That was until a few weeks ago, when S@F did more nights of performance in the space of a week than we normally do in a year. Five nights at New Zealand Fringe, comprising four 3-hour parties and one 5-hour party. My first tour as a performer in an ensemble rather than as a performer/writer/Producer and yes it was straight up my fantasy of Performance Art Sleep-Away Camp come true.SF 5

I got to sing some of my favourite ever weepie anthems- Nothing Compares To You, It’s A Heartache, Heart-Shaped Box- and leap around like a madman to our resident DJ/best DJ living Dead DJ Joke. I got to have my first experience of roving performance/space filling performance that I could actually enjoy (it’s not my skill set but being part of the shock and awe factor of a 10-person ensemble is defs the way to do it). Most of all I got to indulge my love doing of Long, Extended, Physical performances. Like seriously, doing physically challenging stuff for ages in front of an audience is so my thing. So so my thing.

SF 2

Advertisements

Venus 1

When Mayor Of The Canberra Arts Scene Venus Mantrap invites you to be her second banana for a 2-hour performance at the National Gallery of Australia, launching and taking aesthetic cues from the David Hockney exhibition, you say ‘How High?’.

Lip-synching, even just back-up lip-synching, alongside Canberra’s greatest drag performer was a daunting challenge, but the fact that every song Venus programmed is one etched into the fibres of my heart (yes there was more than one B-52s track) made it easy to dive right in.

It was so so fun learning into the sidekick/bit-of-stuff-on-the-side role, and if I do say so myself Venus and I had an easy chemistry that the crowd loved. I really really want to do it again.

Babyfreeze launched their new EP Sometimes Leather back in November.

sometimes leather cover.jpg

Set to play at LoBrow, the venue sadly closed a week before our launch! After scrambling to find another venue, I had a ‘eureka!’ moment – what if we put on the gig ourselves, guerrilla-style? I’ve always wanted to do a guerrilla show like Hashemoto and The Cashews, and this seemed like a perfect opportunity. We hired a generator, I brought my PA and the gig went ahead at Commonwealth Park amphitheatre (previously the location for this amazing video).

To be honest, I thought we might run into more issues, but the entire night went smoothly, both the acts and the audience galvanised by the clandestine novelty (I counted fifty punters). Listening to devdsp as the sun set over the lake was one of my musical highlights of the year.

Typically this is the point in the blog post where we’d breakdown the making of the EP, but that got its own one page splash in BMA!  

bma babyfreeze

Here’s the transcript:


BABYFREEZE have been making electro-waves across Canberra since 2008 (even fronting the cover of this esteemed publication in 2012). Despite that, they’ve only just dropped their second EP – the fantastic Sometimes Leather. We invited the core duo – Luke McGrath (L) and Nick Delatovic (N) – to do a track-by-track breakdown of its four songs.

Hound In A Collar 

LM: We recorded the EP in the spare bedroom of my house. All Nick’s vocals were recorded with my one year old daughter Violet at his feet – you can hear her banging percussion in the background of this track. It was in time so we left it in!

I wanted this song to sound like a party – my model was Swingin’ Medallion’s Double Shot Of My Baby’s Love. The most important thing you need for a party is PEOPLE and as such, it didn’t really come together until adding bass from Kevin Lauro, guitar from Fossil Rabbit, vocals from Lulu Tantrum, and congas, scratching, and rapping from Coolio Desgracias.

Fun fact: the synth solo is actually Nick’s voice run through a guitar amp and re-pitched.

ND: I’d been re-reading a lot of 80s X-Men comics by the famously perverted writer Chris Claremont. He constantly uses sexually-charged mind control scenarios and sub/dom imagery; it was all pretty formative on me as a kid. This song ended up a Submissive’s Anthem but a few of the specific lines are direct quotes from Storm and Wolverine. 

Luke’s track is mega bouncy and friendly so I wrote a vocal that deliberately didn’t match the chords or bass line, so it could only work as an obnoxious shout. 

Frantic 

LM: This is the song that kicked off the project – I had the high concept that the EP should be garage rock except played on electronic instruments. I wrote the riff on guitar then listened to a lot of Tobacco, and decided it needed to be pitch-bent synth. I wanted the verses to mirror the title so performed them in an out-of-breath full-on style. For me, being in a band is like being an actor – I love to play characters different to myself.

ND: Luke’s lead vocal turns are always the highlight of our live set. We knew this was a good track but the first time we played it live it was like we forgot we were even at a gig with a crowd – we both started pogoing around like we were alone in our bedrooms. This whole record has a level of self-indulgence that I really like.

Pussy Mad

LM: Nick came in and recorded the vocal with just single root bass notes as backing, allowing me to build the rest of the track around it, doing my best impression of Future Islands. Fossil Rabbit added the guitar which raises the anthem-ness to U2 levels.

ND: I wrote this song about four years ago, back when I had a lot less modelling for how to handle my non-monogamous wiring. It’s a 100% earnest, serious song about being trapped by your own limited vocabulary around sex and relationships. The word choice will be a dealbreaker for some, which is more than valid of course, but this record was the perfect place for it to finally land and I’m thrilled with it. 

No Solomon

LM: I got the title from watching Whit Stillman’s Love & Friendship. Kate Beckinsdale describes a particularly dense character as being ‘no Solomon’. I thought that made a great opening line for a list-song, where we sing to an imagined ex-girlfriend and list all of the things her new boyfriend is NOT.

ND: The chorus is my favourite thing that I wrote for the record, it’s like a genderless sci-fi version of an Isaac Hayes ‘Lover Man’ thing. Which I’m sure will be the premise of a whole future Babyfreeze record one day. 

LM: The first and last sounds on the record are Coolio Desgracias scratching. This is not a coincidence.


To cap off a bumper year for Babyfreeze, Hound In A Collar was recently named ‘party track of the year’ in 2XX Local’n’Live’s top 20 songs of the year!

2018 is set to be even bigger – Nick and I are currently working on several Babyfreeze projects, including a Dead DJ Joke helmed EP, a Coolio Desgracias collaboration, and our first full length album, Disco Room.

Nicky DI

So I long ago gave up on the idea that I was ever gonna learn to play an instrument properly. I’ve gotten a good singing voice together through pure attrition, and collaboration and co-writing is my whole thing anyway, plus I’m lazy and I don’t care who knows.

But like I’m still hammy enough to want to do solo sets sometimes, and I get asked to sometimes. So that’s been a thing to work out.

The This Band Will Self-Destruct songs are maybe my favorite I’ve ever written (along with my co-writers of course) but the militancy of the band-that-only-exists-for-a-day format posed the question of how I’ll ever get to sing them live.

Cut to- Me on stage at the Phoenix, singing along to backing tracks on my phone that are just the live Self-Destruct tracks with my vocals removed to as much of a degree as Sam ‘producer of modern music’ King could remove them.

The Blade Winner was the first artist I saw do the Yes-I’m-Just-Singing-Along-To-My-Phone-And-BTW-You-Love-It thing. He’s since moved on to actual live instruments like an idiot, so I feel even less bad for biting his style. My girlfriend Adelaide helped me come up with the stage name Nicky DI, I know you don’t care but names are very important to me.

God knows how well it works, but’s it’s a Sometimes Food that you’re all have to swallow from now.

Superior Man 3

YOU: Hey Nick, I hear you’re been cast in Chenoeh Miller‘s new show?

ME: Yeah, I mean (sigh) I always just say yes to Cheneoh’s shows sight unseen, ’cause it’s just always a great out-of-the-comfort-zone time. But I think I fucked up with this one. Apparently it’s about Men and Masculinity and How To Be A Good Man and it wants to provide a voice for Good Men and oh fuck what a boring awful idea and I don’t wanna doooo it!

(3 months later)

YOU: So how did the development week go on Superior Man?

ME: I mean, selfishly I had a great time. The cast is 100% people I’ve wanted to work with on a bigger project. We all gelled big time. Like with all Chenoeh’s stuff I was pushed way out on a limb in a way that I really value and enjoy. The usual focus on physical ordeal, duration, repetition and person-to-person intimacy. And look even though I’m still in my wanky space of not feeling like category:man is the right way to explain anything about my personal experiences I realise now that I am perceived as a man by others and that that creates phenomena that’s worth talking about. But I still worry that we’re gonna fall into obvious traps of gender essentialism and false equivalency and just plain being boring and pointless.

Superior Man 2

(Two months later)

YOU: So how’s rehearsal week going?

ME: I mean, Chen has done so much patient work in addressing our concerns and I realise now that it’s first and foremost a Chenoeh Show. You know, non-literal and imagery-based, and fundamentally from her creative point of view. Hopefully not non-literal in a cop-out say-nothing way, but I feel like Chen’s always balanced that well in the past so I’m just being precious. There’s a lot of meta stuff in the show now, like our actual concerns and worries about how to do the show is in the text. If that’s a cop-out it’s one that’s gotten me over the line in terms of being comfortable with my involvement in the show. I definitely feel like I can invite people now. If they hate it or they’re bored by it then that’s okay, as long as they see that we get their concerns.

(One week later)

YOU: How did stuff go with the show? Sorry I didn’t make it, house-hunting stuff has been a nightmare! This is why people give up on renting!

ME: Oh no sweat, we had good turn-out. Yeah like it went well. Intense. It’s a Feelings-Heavy show. But the audiences were lovely. Lots of positive feedback, and the critiques and reviews all engaged with it really generously on it’s own terms. I mean at best we offered the obvious message that Ideas Of Manhood Are Both Damaging And Alluring. I doubt that was a huge revelation for many. But a lot of people seemed to key in to us specifically as individual performers, which at least alleviated my panic about whether we would be seen as trying to represent all men. Look we were a bunch of middle-class Canberrans performing for same so take everything I’m saying with a grain of salt. It was a very selfish show for me, it was really about getting to work with Chen and the cast.

Erica Fields’ unfailing rigour and intelligence.

Raoul Cramers’ honesty and skill.

Chris Endrey’s trust and versatility.

Oliver Levi Malouf’s sheer craft and sense of perspective.

And as always, Chenoeh Miller’s pure command of form.

Sorry, I broke my little literary conceit there.

Superior Man 1

Aero2 28

2 years since the inaugural Cell Block 69 Dance-Off. 1 year since Luke and I were roped in to being part of Catherine ‘Benevolent Tyrant of Dance’ James’ winning team, Mergers and Acquisitions. 3 months since Catherine split us into two separate teams, Mergers AND Acquisitions, as part of her escalating philosophy of ruthless Dance-Off Dominance. The 1 time per year when Luke and I are most happy to be mere cogs in the creative war machine servicing someone else’s agenda. As well as the greater agenda of John Farnham and Robert Palmer.

 

Aero2 20

The notorious enabling force that is the You Are Here festival  has lead Claire ‘Tour De Force’ Granata and I to formalise Total Spray as an ongoing theatre company and take our 3-hour telethon of physical ordeal to festivals around the country. Our first stop was Bondi Feast, where they set us up in the ballroom at Bondi Pavillion. The fact that said ballroom routinely hosts actual aerobics classes led to a very specific, almost unsettling version of engagement from the local crowd. Hopefully we repaid their enthusiasm and endurance with a truly holistic wellness(tm) experience. Next Stop- Crack Theatre Festival!